Style: True Religion’s ‘The Art of Jeans’

Guest post by @JENDELLA

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

On a chilly Thursday evening the exclusive Rossano Ferretti Hairspa played host to True Religion Brand Jeans’ exhibition, ‘The Art of Jeans’. Tucked away from the bustling crowds of Oxford Street and Regent Street, the luxurious location with its black chandelier light fittings, black carpets and cream walls was a perfect backdrop for the striking pieces of art put together by Christopher Heeney, visual brand director at True Religion.

The exhibition was a chance for Christopher and True Religion to show how they pushed their denim wear “beyond the blue jean” alongside promoting their extensive and exciting range of womenswear. Across two floors of the hair spa were Pop Art influenced prints and large frames – each one uniquely distressed and vandalised to suit its feature. The jeans were displayed as three-dimensional pieces, somewhere between prized objects and art installations, the neon canvas backgrounds referencing the iconic work of Andy Warhol.

The choice of artistic influence was particularly relevant given the status of denim jeans as classic pop cultural items. Ever since they traversed from practical outwear for cowboys into staple wardrobe items and fashion statements, they have formed an intrinsic part of pop and youth culture. Wearable by the young, old, rich and poor, the humble denim jean has democratised casual wear while blurring the lines between formal and the informal (the dress code ‘smart casual’ was made for a good pair of jeans and a nice top), which mirrors the way Pop Art meshed together the worlds of high-brow exclusive art and low-brow mass consumption.

But back to the jeans! The pieces displayed on the walls were actual works of art, with lots of frayed elements, eye-catching tie-dye and tropical sun-seeking prints only deepening the longing for the ever-elusive British summer. It was a great opportunity to show the quality and detailed construction of the jeans which after initial completion go through a two-week process of hand finishing to perfect each detail and distressed element. One particularly stand-out frame featured a multi-textured jacket, gloriously adorned with studs and woven fabrics while other pairs of jeans included Native American motifs, patchwork construction and a pair of suspenders, all adding to the nouveau Americana vibe of the brand.

Some of the canvases were so great to look at that I was tempted to inquire about the price of them, but seeing as we are still in a recession, restraint got the better of me and I guess the artistic side of me will just have to settle for a pair of True Religion jean – can’t be mad about that though!

Words and Images by @JENDELLA.

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans'

True Religion's 'The Art of Jeans' photographed by Jendella

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